Matrix movie analysis

Some of the hidden meaning is easy to find - other stuff is buried so deeply or only briefly referred to that a lot of the fun is digging around to see what you can find.

Matrix movie analysis

Themes The Blurred Line Between Humans and Machines The films of the Matrix trilogy pit man against machine in a clearly drawn battle, but they also reveal that the humans are more machinelike than they think, and that the machines possess human qualities as well. The humans, for their part, are as relentlessly driven as machines.

Her actions suggest her love, but her love expresses itself not so much as passion or emotion than as ceaseless, frenzied activity. Their incredible fighting skills and superhuman strength seem to put them in the machine category, and their fluid movements are the result of programs that have been downloaded into them.

Matrix movie analysis

The Agents, by contrast, are fluid, adaptive, and creative. They shift seamlessly throughout the programs and listen intently to human speech, responding accordingly and sensitively.

When Agent Smith removes his glasses and orders the other Agents out of the room in a decidedly unmachinelike manner so he can confess something personal to Morpheus, he infuses his speech with human emotions such as disgust and horror. Indeed, Smith seems to become almost desperately human, and his endless replication of himself is decidedly egocentric.

With the line between man and machine blurred to the point almost of disappearing, the Matrix trilogy raises the complicated question of how interdependent man and machine actually are, or might be. One fear of artificial intelligence is that technology will entrap us in level upon level of dependence, and in the trilogy Neo discovers more and more about the thoroughness and subtlety of the Matrix.

As long as humans turn to technology to solve human problems, humans and technology are interdependent. In the trilogy, the machines are dependent on the humans for life, and they grow and harvest humans so they can continue to exist. Free Will in the Matrix and the Real World When Morpheus asks Neo to choose between a red pill and a blue pill, he essentially offers the choice between fate and free will.

Matrix movie analysis

In the Matrix, fate rules—since the world is preconstructed and actions predetermined, all questions already have answers and any choice is simply the illusion of choice. In the real world, humans have the power to change their fate, take individual action, and make mistakes. The real world is a mess, dangerous and destitute.

Cypher, who regrets choosing the red pill and ultimately chooses to return to the Matrix, views any pleasure, even false pleasure, as better than no pleasure at all. Neo, Morpheus, Trinity, and the others in Zion, of course, value free will and reality no matter how unpleasant they may be.

The Matrix trilogy suggests that everyone has the individual responsibility to make the choice between the real world and an artificial world. Though Neo is the exemplar of free will, fate plays a large role in his adventure. Neo relies on the Oracle, and everything she says comes true in some way.

Nonetheless, the Oracle is always right, raising doubts about how much free Neo actually has.

Plot Overviews

In this sense, she shares the same final goals as Morpheus, Neo, and Trinity, and together they actively shape the future. The Relationship Between Body, Brain, and Mind The Matrix trilogy explores the interconnection between the body, the brain, and the mind, especially how that connection changes when the world turns out to be an illusion.

Two different kinds of humans populate the world of the Matrix films:Mar 31,  · "The Matrix" is a visually dazzling cyberadventure, full of kinetic excitement, but it retreats to formula just when it's getting interesting.

It's kind of a letdown when a movie begins by redefining the nature of reality, and ends with a shoot-out.3/5. The Matrix is a science fiction action film written and directed by The Wachowskis and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving, and Joe benjaminpohle.com depicts a dystopian future in which reality as perceived by most humans is actually a simulated reality called "the Matrix", created by sentient machines to .

The MATRIX - Understanding The Matrix - Meaning And Interpretations

A summary of Themes in 's The Matrix Trilogy. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Matrix Trilogy and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Morpheus has sent Trinity to contact Neo, believing he is The One of prophecy.

Morpheus explains it to Neo in this way: "When the Matrix was first built there was a man born inside that had the ability to change what he wanted, to remake the Matrix as he saw fit. In the Matrix, she always wears black leather or latex, and with her closely cropped hair she appears both androgynous and attractive.

. At that point, the movie becomes a series of things Neo overcomes or defeats to move to higher and higher levels of ability inside The Matrix.

Once Neo commits to the rescue of Morpheus (and Trinity insists on going along), the wow factor gets kicked up a .

Matrix: A philosophical analysis